Branford House Antiques
A Historic 1850s Farmhouse on a Scenic Vermont Dairy Farm








Recently Sold This Olde Office Antique Typewriters

Several collectors have requested we keep a reference for sold machines for information and pricing information. So, here it is.



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Gunda Index Typewriter serial # 1564

Most of the exceptions to index typewriting technology dying out at the turn-of-the-century were German machines and here is another example. The Gunda was not a toy but a true index typewriter by Gunda-Werk GmbH and made in the late 1920s. This machine has lost its case over the years and has a condition rating of 2,3.

$185.00

SOLD


Remington Noiseless Model 7 Portable Typewriter

From This Olde Office collection:This Remington Noiseless Model 7 (serial #H40371) four bank typewriter comes with its original carrying case which does have some issues but is still doing its job of protecting the typewriter. The typewriter itself is in very good condition and is operating as intended and with good action. This machine was introduced in 1931 as a lightweight desk top model with most of the features of a desk top typewriter but offered in a portable typewriter. We have estimated the condition rating on this typewriter at 2,2.

$150.00

SOLD


Perkeo Folding Portable Typewriter serial # 25536

From This Olde Office comes this beautiful Perkeo (serial 25536), folding antique portable typewriter in its original case. While I do not think of the Perkeo as rare, I can only recall having one other one in over 30 years of doing this. I cannot recall seeing another offered for sale in a long time. The Perkeo is very similar to the Standard and to the folding Corona 3. Just like those machines, this one folds the same way with the carriage folding over the top and onto the keyboard. Since it was contemporary to the early days of those machines, I wonder if there were infringement lawsuits. To my eye, the Perkero is much more similar to the folding Corona 3 then the folding Fox portables were and Corona was successful in removing them from the market. Maybe because the Perkeo was made in Germany?

This machine was made by Clemens Muller A.G. in Dresden, Germany in or around 1912. It is in very nice condition with no cracks, breaks or repairs to the frame and with all of its original paint. The graphics are very clear and easy to read. This machine has a very nice steel and glass keyboard. It is not quite QWERTY but is QWERTZ. The machine is working very nicely and with good action. The carriage advances when the keys and space bar are struck. The only issue I could find is that the "I" key is sticking a bit. We are estimating its
condition rating at 2,2-. The "2-" is because of the sticking "I" key.

It comes in its original canvas over wood case which is also in good condition.

$375.00

SOLD


Oliver 3 Antique Typewriter

From This Olde Office:The Oliver 3 was first introduced in 1898 and that is the last patent date listed on this typewriter. This 19th century machine is intact with all components present. There is a considerable amount of dirt and grime build up and there is surface tarnish but much of it does come off with elbow grease. There are some paint losses. The carriage needs to be retied in order to fully work as intended. This machine still has its original ribbon covers which are often missing. All the decals are present, clear and easy to read. We have estimated the condition rating on this machine at 3,3.

$175.00

SOLD


Presentation Corona 3 serial #V 690000

From This Olde Office collection: This very special and quite beautiful LC Smith & Corona folding 3 bank Corona 3 typewriter features a unique granulated finish on the sides and front and probably was made to celebrate the incredibly successful accomplishment indicated by the serial number.

While it does have the Corona name on the center front it also has the LC Smith & Corona on the front bottom center indicating it was made after 1927 and the approximate time of the merger. The center bottom frame may have been repaired but it is hard to tell for sure. If it was repaired it was a very good job and the frame is now completely structurally sound.

This machine is clean and all bright metal is shinny and without tarnish. It is working well and with very good action. The keyboard is qwerty and features unique and actually stunning steel and plastic key tabs in remarkable mint condition. It comes in its original material over wood case which is in good condition and still has its original key. This was obviously a specially made machine and probably was a presentation gift of some sort. There is definitely more to this story. We have estimated the condition rating on this machine at 2,2.

$195.00

SOLD


Stenotype Shothand or Court Reporter Machine

From This Olde Office collection: The Stenotye comes with its original carrying case and original instruction booklet. It is in very good condition and is working as intended. We have estimated its condition rating at 2,2. We believe that this machine dates to the 1930s.

Our price includes free shipping via USPS to anywhere within the lower 48 and there would be an additional $60 USPS International Shipping and Insurance charge for anywhere else in the world.

$175.00

SOLD


Hooven Automatic Typewriter - The Machine & Story

This Hooven, serial No 1629126-5, (indicating c. 1923) was before laser printers and before photocopying when the practical and inexpensive method of copying letters was with carbon paper or a mimeograph. Unfortunately, either method used produced a letter that was obviously a copy and readily identified as a form letter. While there were a few other inventions that duplicated a letter by rewriting it, the Hooven Automatic typewriter became the preferred technology during most of the first half of the 20th century.

The Hooven used the same punched-hole paper tape technology that player pianos used in 1912 when it was first introduced in Cincinnati by The National Automatic Typewriter Company. It was driven by electricity and was probably the most successful early electric typewriter. The first electric typewriter, George Blickensderfer's magnificent machine, was introduced just 10 years earlier. However, in 1902 electricity was still used mostly for lighting. In large urban areas it was only provided to residences during evening hours. So the Electric Blick was a typewriter that frequently could be used only at night. The Electric Blick was around for a short time and today is a very scarce machine and arguably one of the most sought after and most valued of all antique typewriters.

The Hooven, programmed by the punched hole paper roll (today, we would call it software) simply repeated and typed the same letter over and over while occasionally pausing for the attendant to type in personal information (name, addresses, dates, etc.) that gave the letter a definite impression of being an original. It was often used by Hollywood stars in answering their fan mail, including known Hooven users Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. It was advertised that one secretary could easily run three to four Hoovens at the same time and produce the results otherwise requiring a dozen typists.

There were two machines required. The Hooven Automatic Typewriter, which was a specially modified Underwood No 5 (Underwood installed heavy duty carriage return springs) which was attached over a patented Hooven mechanism on a special cabinet and stand to catch and hold the paper roll and side shelves to hold stationery. The second machine was the perforator which was about the size of a typewriter and punched (typed) the required holes into the paper roll. An advertisement in 1920 listed the Hooven Automatic Typewriter priced at $710 and the perforator at $75. Combined, this was about the price of two new Cadillac automobiles. A paper roll program could produce about 30 letters before needing replacement and the two machines, with a good maintenance program, would last for years.

The relative expensive cost of the machines kept the technology from many users until Hooven established a letter typing service in New York with outlets throughout the United States where people could bring or send their letters to be "Hoovenized". This made the technology available and affordable on a pay as you go basis. For an example, you could have a 100 word letter Hoovenized for only $.04 per letter, 200 words for $.0325, 300 words for $.0283 or 400 words for $.02625 per letter. There was a 5% discount on lots of 500 letters, 10% discount for 1,000 letters, and 15% discount on 5,000 letters. Of course there were special quotations available for larger quantities. Also, pen signatures were available for $3.00 to $5.00 per 1,000; carbon copies were $.01 each (Hooven supplied the tissue and carbon paper), addressing envelopes was $5.00 to $8.00 per 1,000 and foreign languages were 25% extra plus a roll-cutting charge. Today you can make a photocopied letter at Staples for about the same price it cost to have one Hoovenized nearly 100 years ago.

C. Earle Hooven was the president of the National Automatic Typewriter Company and remained president through several name changes including the 1919 change to The Hooven Automatic typewriter Company when the company moved into the old American Can manufacturing plant in Hamilton, Ohio. Mr. Hooven was president for over 30 years until he died in the early 1940s. He was also the longest resident to reside at the historic 1863 Lane- Hooven House which his wife had inherited. Today, it is a restored historical building and an important part of Hamilton, Ohio's heritage. The house is available for tours and possesses one of the other few still surviving Hooven Automatic Typewriters.

The Hooven Automatic Typewriter and Hoovenizing letter writing services were very popular until World War II. After the war, IBM and other electric typewriters offered affordable and less maintenance required technology that obsoleted the Hooven and today, very few specimens of this early electric typewriter survive.

This Hooven Automatic Typewriter has its side shelves and bottom cabinet and it comes with the last paper roll it used to type its last letter many decades ago. Due it its size and weight it would probably be best to either pick it up here in Vermont or for us to deliver it. Our suggested $300 delivery charge would cover us personally delivering it anywhere (and dead heading back home) within 300 miles from here in Vermont to New Hampshire, Mass, Conn or New York. We would consider other locations for an additional charge.

$7500.00

SOLD


Hammond No 2 Typewriter with Ideal Keyboard

This1890s Hammond No 2 typewriter is in good operating order and while it is in "as found" condition, it could use a good cleaning but is still in very good shape. We could not locate a serial number. All the keys are present and working and none are broken or chipped as is often the case with the Hammond ideal keyboard models 2 and 12. Some keys do show wear with portions of their letters worn off. We did fully restore the beautiful tiger oak case and we estimate the condition rating on this machine to be a 2,2. This machine has two type shuttles installed and also comes with an extra script type shuttle still in its original box.

This item has free shipping anywhere within the USA and an additional charge of $75 is ship via US Priority International Mail anywhere outside of the USA.

Paul Lippman (author of American Typewriters) called the Hammond Typewriter "…one of the finest in typewriter history". It was designed by James Bartlett Hammond, a Civil War Telegrapher, and E.J. Manning and following about ten years of design effort achieved their first patents in 1880. It is somewhat arguable when the Model One (the first model) actually entered the market. Many feel it was in 1881 but there is some evidence it didn't show up in the market place until 1885 with the second model entering the market in 1893. The Model One has ebony keys encased in mahogany while the model two has plastic (thermo set plastic often called Bakelite) keys which were open and not encased and the wood base on the Model Two is oak instead of the more expensive mahogany wood. So, like the case with most evolutionary technologies, the second model was less expensive to manufacture and easier to service.

The Hammond is a swinging sector machine with the paper fed from a storage carriage under the platen and the hammer striking the paper from the rear. This methodology generally is considered to produce the most consistent and uniform key stroke and therefore the most uniform print impression. It used interchangeable type shuttles made out of vulcanite or hard rubber with literally hundreds of type font and language combination offerings. The Model One had a split shuttle and later models had one shuttle while still later models could hold two different shuttles at one time.

The first model was only available in an ideal keyboard (curved keyboard) and the early Model Twos likewise were only available in the ideal keyboard style while later on they were also offered in the straight keyboard. Eventually, the model twos and twelve's were offered in either keyboard or then only the straight version.

While the Hammond has often been said to be reminiscent of a church organ it has no known connection to the famous Hammond organ.

$925.00

SOLD


Stenotype Master Model

This is a Stenotype Master Model stenographer's shorhand or court reporter's machine. It is marked LaSalle Extension University. It is from the 1930s and has a great Art Deco look.

$85.00

SOLD


Write Easy Index Typewriter

The Write Easy was a Gunda typewriter by Gunda-Werk GMbH meant for the UK market. It probably is the scarcer version of the Gunda. See the Gunda and the MW index typewriters in our collection for more information about this exception to index typewriter technology surviving after the turn-of-the-century.

This particular Write Easy is serial number 79267 and comes with its original base and tin lid. It is in good condition and we have estimated its rating at 2,2.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere in the USA and an additional S&H&Insurance charge of $25 for anywhere outside of the USA.

$245.00

SOLD


Edison Mimeograph Model 1 Typewriter

This Edison Model 1 Mimeograph Typewriter comes from John Overall of New Braunfels, Texas. It was collected by his father some five decades earlier. This is the first time it comes to market in 50 or more years.

There were three Edison models and this was the first one with 78 characters. It was introduced to the market in 1894 (a year before the patent was granted) and taken off the market just a few years later in 1897. It is an index typewriter which strikes under the platen (understrike) meaning one cannot see the typing. Many early typewriters were understrikes but this technology was generally obsolete by this time with most new typewriters entering the market featuring visible typewriting. It was boycotted by typewriter retailers who were influenced by other typewriter manufacturers and executives with negative bias toward Thomas Edison. Also, it was an obviously inferior typewriter being difficult and slow to operate.

As once related by George Washington Newton Yost: for years before the Edison Typewriter was introduced, and at various times, major typewriter industry executives and entrepreneurs would approach Edison to partner in creating and introducing a new "Edison Typewriter". Edison, each time would respond to them, in a rather pretentious manner, that he could develop a typewriter by himself, without any assistance, anytime he chose and did not consider it much of a challenge.

Major contemporary antique typewriter authors today (including Lippman, Rehr and Russo) generally accept Edison's comments that he "...didn't really invent the Edison Typewriter but simply allowed AB Dick to put his name on it". While Adler suggests Edison did invent it. As a side bar, Adler featured an Edison Typewriter on the cover of his first book. I conjecture that when it became clear it was an inferior typewriter (and a complete product failure) is when Edison made his distancing comments.

The Edison Mimeograph Typewriter was designed to cut stencils for the Mimeograph copy machines which were Edison patented inventions and marketed by AB Dick. The problem was that it generally had the same infrastructure and almost the same cost as other upright keyboard typewriters of the time, all of which could efficiently cut a stencil. Also, it was very slow and generally a poor typewriter and hence became a rare Edison product failure, Today it is a great, rare, cross collectible, ie; Edison and antique typewriter collectors.

This machine is complete and in good condition with the cast iron frame and cast iron index without any breaks, cracks or repairs. The paper index is complete, clear and easy to read. The center pinstripe design is also clear and easy to see. There is some light surface tarnish and the machine does have dirt build up and could use a good cleaning and a little light oil. It is working in that the carriage advances when the key bar is depressed but not consistently. We have estimated the condition rating at 2-,2-

$8300.00

SOLD


Typatune Musical Typewriter

This musical typewriter is a "Typatune". Each key does clearly and loundly present a piano like note and each key represents a different note. I presume it was used for teaching music lessons and maybe typewriting lessons as well. It is fully functional and in very good condition. This is the machine depicted in the photo on page 190 of Adler's: Antique Typewriters, From Creed to Qwerty. We think it dates back to the 1930s or thereabouts. All keys do sound unique notes and we would estimate its condition at 2,2. It is approximatley 12 inches deep, 10.5 inches wide and 4.5 inches high.

$450.00

SOLD


Hammond Model 12 serial# 141060

This Hammond 12 has a straight keyboard and is very clean and shows well. It has its full oak case with the instructions still glued under the lid. We grade this machine as a 2+,2.

$525.00

SOLD


US Stenograph - 1st Shorthand Machine

This shothand typewriter was the genious of Miles Bartholomew. It has ten keys (two of which appear to be space bars) that type a variety of dashes which can later be interpreted into words. The machine shows patent dates of 1879 and 1882 but probably was not manufactured until 1889. It truly was the first sucessful short hand machine that eventually evolved with many technological innovations into today's court reporter devices. The paper roll and holder folds over to rest on the top of the keyboard and this machine is really quite small at only 8 inches wide, 7.5 inches deep and only 2.5 inches high with the paper roll folded down and about 7.5 inches high with it up. This particular machine has been fully restored and has a condition rating of 2,2.

$1250.00

SOLD


Antique Hammond Multiplex Typewriter serial #182610

From This Olde Office collection: This Hammond Multiplex typewriter, circa: 1915, comes with its original oak case. It has a very unique keyboard with a dual English and an Asian or Middle Eastern (?) language. It is working but some of the keys are hard to strike. Generally, the keys strike the ribbon, return to rest and the carriage advances as intended. A good cleaning and a little light oil would improve its function. The case base is very sound and without and cracks or losses but the lid does have a little separation in one area on the top and would easily be improved with a bit of gluing. We have estimated its condition rating at 2,2-.

$400.00

SOLD


Lambert Typewriter serial# 4035

This is the earlier verson of a popular index typewriter. It has the embosed and golden lettering "Lambert". It comes with its original case but is a square oak case and not the cylinder type oak veneer version with the globe decal like the other Lambert offering we currently have listed. What is somewhat unusual is that all the lettering on the keys appears original but is in a very bright red color which does make it quite attractive. The last patent date listed on the machine is 1900 and it also states that it was made by the Lambert Manufacturing Company. It was most likely made in the 1900-1902 time frame. This machine is in as found condtion and it and its case could use a good cleaning. Otherwise, it is in excellent condition. All the lettering, pinstriping and decoration is bright and easy to read. The machine is functioning well and has a very good action. We have estimated its condition rating as a 2,2. On October 30, 2010 we reduced the price from $1.275.00.

There is free shipping anywhere in the USA and an additional cost of $75 for S&H anywhere outside of the USA.

$1020.00

SOLD


LC Smith & Corona Standard 4 bank typewriter #1

This is a 1930s vintage LC Smith & Corona, Standard four bank portable. It comes with its original leather and wood carrying case. It has incredibly good action (see below) and if you want a typewriter to actually type with than this is the machine for you. Like all of our typewriters, it could use a new ribbon if you do plan to type with it.

This is one of the machines in the collection I bought in the early 1990s from Mr. Feldman who was a typewriter repairman in New York City from the 1940s thru the 1980s. His largest account was the Los Angels Times New York City office. He went there one day a week and would tweek the machines and change ribbons, etc. Whenever they needed a new typewriter he would take in a trade and purchase a new one for them. This was probably one of the trades-ins.

Usually, when I acquired portables I would bring them to the Rosebowl on the third Sunday of the month and sell them for only $10 each. People would buy them for their children to play with (typewriters are literally magnets for kids) as though they were toys. People would also purchased them for the keys to make jewelery (now that has become a part of the current Steampunk movement) and some would repair them for typing envelopes and other light typing.

Now, Mr. Feldman's machines were, and still are, a completely different story. All of his portables have incredibly good action. They literally jump to life when you hit the keyboard. He was truly a master technician and his machines remain a testimonial his talent. If you want a portable to actually use for typing, then you can't go wrong with one of his old machines.

$135.00

SOLD


Caligraph No2 serial# 24903 Fully Restored

This is an antique circa 1880s Caligraph No2 typewriter. This typewriter has been fully restored. The keyboard includes both lower and upper case letters since the shift key wasn't invented yet. The Calagraph model No 1 has upper case letters only while the No 2 (like this one) came out a few months later with the dual keyboard and was tauted to be quite an advancement. Also, the platen has tiny flat surfaces since curved typewriter keys were not yet invented and printer's type was still being used. Printer's type required typing on a flat surface. We have graded this Calagraph No 2 as a 2,2.

The Calagraph Number 1 and Number 2 each came out in the early 1880s making them very early typewriters and along with the first Hammonds were the 2nd and 3rd sucessful keyboard typewriters to enter the market

$1025.00

SOLD


LC Smith & Corona Portable 4 Bank #3

This is a late 1930s or early 40s vintage LC Smith & Corona, Standard four bank portable. It comes with its original leather and wood carrying case. It has incredibly good action (see below) and if you want a typewriter to actually type with than this is the machine for you. Like all of our typewriters, it could use a new ribbon if you do plan to type with it.

This is one of the machines in the collection I bought in the early 1990s from Mr. Feldman who was a typewriter repairman in New York City from the 1940s thru the 1980s. His largest account was the Los Angels Times New York City office. He went there one day a week and would tweek the machines and change ribbons, etc. Whenever they needed a new typewriter he would take in a trade and purchase a new one for them. This was probably one of the trades-ins.

Usually, when I acquired portables I would bring them to the Rosebowl fleamarket in Pasadena, California on the third Sunday of the month and sell them for only $10 each. People would buy them for their children to play with (typewriters are literally magnets for kids) as though they were toys. People would also purchased them for the keys to make jewelery (now that has become a part of the current Steampunk movement) and some would repair them for typing envelopes and other light typing.

Now, Mr. Feldman's machines were, and still are, a completely different story. All of his portables have incredibly good action. They literally jump to life when you hit the keyboard. He was truly a master technician and his machines remain a testimonial his talent. If you want a portable to actually use for typing, then you can't go wrong with one of his old machines. We have graded this machine as a 2,2.

$135.00

SOLD


LC Smith & Corona Four Bank Portable #2

This is a 1930s vintage LC Smith & Corona, Standard four bank portable. It comes with its original leather and wood carrying case. It has incredibly good action (see below) and if you want a typewriter to actually type with than this is the machine for you. Like all of our typewriters, it could use a new ribbon if you do plan to type with it.

This is one of the machines in the collection I bought in the early 1990s from Mr. Feldman who was a typewriter repairman in New York City from the 1940s thru the 1980s. His largest account was the Los Angels Times New York City office. He went there one day a week and would tweek the machines and change ribbons, etc. Whenever they needed a new typewriter he would take in a trade and purchase a new one for them. This was probably one of the trades-ins.

Usually, when I acquired portables I would bring them to the Rosebowl fleamarket in Padadens, California on the third Sunday of the month and sell them for only $10 each. People would buy them for their children to play with (typewriters are literally magnets for kids) as though they were toys. People would also purchased them for the keys to make jewelery (now that has become a part of the current Steampunk movement) and some would repair them for typing envelopes and other light typing.

Now, Mr. Feldman's machines were, and still are, a completely different story. All of his portables have incredibly good action. They literally jump to life when you hit the keyboard. He was truly a master technician and his machines remain a testimonial his talent. If you want a portable to actually use for typing, then you can't go wrong with one of his old machines. We rate this portable as a 2,2.

Our price includes a $100 US Priority Internationl Shipping charge to Hong Kong

$235.00

SOLD


Hammon Multiplex Typewriter serial #AL199488

From This Olde Office collection come this very nice and clean Hammond Multiplex Typewriter (serial # AL199488) from 1914. The Multiplex was designed to hold two (2) type shuttles at the same time and hence its' name: Multiplex. The shuttles could be two different fonts or languages, etc. This machine does have two shuttles with different type print. It also has an additional celluloid keyboard for the second shuttle which fits into clips above the keys to assist in using the alternative shuttle.

This machine is in good condition with no brakes, cracks or repairs in its cast iron frame or metal housing. All the graphics are clear and easy to read. The bright metal is bright and without tarnish. The tin ribbon cases and covers are all original and in good condition. All the letters on the key board and the glass covers are clear, easy to read and without any breaks or cracks. There are no paint losses. It comes in its original case which is structurally sound but the canvas covering is separating in some places. This machine is working as intended and we have estimated its condition rating at 2,2.

$395.00

SOLD


Franklyn No 9 Typewriter serial#18861

Price was reduced on 12/4/2012 from $1,175 to $940

This Franklyn was purchased in the 1904-1907 time period by Herbert (Bert) Davidson of Brockton, Massachusetts. Bert was only the second individual in the state of Massachusetts to hold both a professional steam engineer and a professional electrical engineer license. Herbert was an associate and worked for Thomas Edison and is seen in at least one surving photograph with Edison at the Brockton site. He went on to became chief engineer of the company (The Brockton Edison Company) which was the site of what has generally come to be recognized as the world's first "...commercially viable, safe, and standardized power production and distribution network"

This machine was Herberts' personal typewriter and used almost exclusively by him during the balance of his life. He died of tuberculosis just before the start of WW1 and left the typewriter to his eldest son, Alton Baker Davidson. Alton became a very successful and well accomplished professional photographer in the Brockton area. He treasured and proudly displayed this typewriter, one of only a very few items passed on by his father, all of his life. Alton enjoyed a long life and retirement in the Cape Cod area and died at the age of 95.

This Franklyn No 9 typewriter, serial number 18861 was made some time between 1904 and 1907. The No 9 model was the last Franklyn model made by the Franklyn Typewriter Company of Boston, Massachusetts. There is a mention of a Model 10 but none have yet turned up in the typewriter collector community. The Franklyn Typewriter Company was purchased by the Victor Typewriter Company of New York in 1907 and the Franklyn models were discountinued and replaced with the more contempory looking (featuring visible typing) Victor models.

This machine comes with its original tin lid and wooden case base. It appears to have all major parts present. We have estimated its condition rating to be a 3, 2- due to some loss of paint and the presence of tarnish on most of the bright parts. It is working with the carriage advancing with space and letter key strikes but many of the keys are sticky. A very good cleaning, polishing and little lubication would help a great deal.

Our price includes $60 for packing, insurance and shipping anywhere within the USA via US Parcel Post. There is an additional $125 charge to ship anywhere outside of the USA via US Priority International Mail. We will discount the price by $60 to ship on your UPS or Fedx number or for in store pick up.

$825.00

SOLD


Remington Noiseless Model 7 Portable Typewriter

This Remington, Noiseless, Model 7, four bank, portable typewriter is in very good working order and we have graded it as a 2,2. It comes in its original carrying case which still works well but does show wear and has some losses. The typewriter displays patent number 1,471,152 which was issued in 1923.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and there is an additional $70 charge for shipping anywhere outside of the USA.

$185.00

SOLD


Remington Noisless Portable Typewriter serial # N56476item, #11TOO10952

This Remington Noiseless portable typewriter is in very good operating condition. It is missing the number "0" key tab but the key does work and strike without the tab so we have estimated the rating for this machine at 3,2. It comes with its original carrying case which does show wear and has some losses.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and there would be an additional $70 shipping charge for shipping anywhere else.

$160.00

SOLD


Remington Noiseless Portable serial# N56476 item""#11TOO10952

This is a four bank Remington Noiseless portable typewriter and it still has its original carring case. It is in good working order and has good action so we have estimated it condition rating at 2,2. It is missing one ribbon cover.

$110.00

SOLD


Royal Portable Typewriter item# 11TOO10953

This is a four (4) bank Royal Portable Typewriter and is in good working order and has good action. We have estimated its condition rating at 2,2. It comes with its original carrying case.

$110.00

SOLD


Hermes 3000 Typewriter

The Hermes 3000 four (4) bank portable typewriter is often considered one of the very best portable typewriters ever made. This one comes from the 1950s and still has its original hard case. It is in very good working order but could use a new ribbon.

$235.00

SOLD


Bennett Typewriter

The Bennett was patented by Charles Bennett (Dover, New Jersey) in 1901, first manufactured in 1907 and at that time marketed as the "Junior" Typewriter. A few years later a paper tray and some other minor improvements were made and it was then manufactured in the Elliott-Fisher plant (Harrisburg, PA) and renamed the Bennett.
The Bennett is generally recognized as the smallest keyboard typewriter ever made. The most famous user was probably Douglas MacArthur who is thought to have carried and used a Bennett typewriter thru both of his World War 1 and World War 11 careers.

This particular Bennett typewriter was made sometime around 1910 and still has its fitted leather carrying case. It is in working order but would need reinking to actually type. While this machine was made in the USA it is marked Bueno Aires with a decal and was obviously
marketed and probably originally sold in South America and then eventually made its way back to the US. The machine, in its case, is approximately 5 inches wide, 2.25 inches high and 10.5 inches long. We would give it a condition grade of a 2-,2.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and there would be an additional international shipping charge of $50 for anywhere outside the US.

$445.00

SOLD


1903 Peerless Calculator serial #3487

From This Olde Office collection comes this early model Peerless calculator marked "patent pending". It has a cast iron frame and base and machined brass cover pieces. All the interior gears appear to be steel. It is approximately 11 inches deep, 5.25 inches high and 17 inches wide. It weighs about 30 pounds. I do not know how to work it and since I have lost my patience a long time ago, I will not attempt to learn how. However, it does appear to be working as intended in that all the gears and cracks are free, move and appear to register. All in all this is a pretty attractive machine,it was state of the art and the highest technology of its time.

It was invented and built in 1903 by Mathias Bauerle (1838-1916) of St. George in the Black Forest of Germany. He was a very successful clockmaker. He entered his new Peerless Adding Machine and won gold medals for it in exhibitions in St. Louis (World's Fair of 1904). Lieg (1905) and Milan (1906).

We are estimating its condition rating at 2,2.

It does have a wooden case which would need to be sent separately so we are selling it separately, see below.

$800.00

SOLD


Underwood 4 Bank Portable Typewriter

This 4 bank Underwood portable typewriter was made in Canada but what is really unusual is its correspondant's case. The case folds out to become a mini table or typewriter stand. It gives true meaning to the term "laptop". This 4 bank Underwood and its fold out mini-table are both in good condition with an estimated conditional rating of 2-,2.

$225.00

SOLD


Wooden Case Only for 1903 Peerless Adding Machine

This is the wood base and wooden lid for the Peerless Adding Machine serial #3487 and for safe shipping reasons we are selling and shipping it separately. It is veneer over solid wood (probably oak) and while there are some veneer losses the case is very structurally sound. It is approximately 19.5 inches long, 14 inches deep and 8 inches high. It has its rear locking devices in place and it still has its original front lock but we do not have a key. It shows (displays) with the machine very nicely.
SOLD


Royal Standard No 5 serial#119936-5

This is the second model Royal, it came out in 1911 and was only made until 1914 when Royal redesigned it to "...look more like other upright typewriters". It was the second and last model of the "flatbeds". We rated this machine as a 2-,2-. It needs a good cleaning and is working but several keys are sticky.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and there is an additional $85 charge for shipping anywhere outside of the USA via US Priority International Mail.

$265.00

SOLD


Corona 3 Folding Typewriter

The Corona 3 Folding Typewriter started more antique typewriter collections than any other single typewriter. The same machine with minor changes and three or four different names was manufactured between 1912 and 1941. Because of its light weight and compact folding style, it was a very popular war correspondent typewriter during both world wars.

This particular machine, was manufactured around 1919, It is in good working condition . We have estimated its condition rating at 2,2.

There is free shipping anywhere within the USA and an additional $50 charge to ship anywhere outside the USA via US Priority International Mail.

$195.00

SOLD


Caligraph No2 Typewriter serial No 17077

This is an antique circa 1880s Caligraph No2 typewriter. This typewriter is in its mostly original condition and only its key cases have been restored. Its original condition is quite remarkable. The keyboard includes both lower and upper case letters since the shift key wasn't invented yet. The Calagraph model No 1 has upper case letters only while the No 2 (like this one) came out a few months later with the dual keyboard and was tauted to be quite an advancement. Also, the platen has tiny flat surfaces since curved typewriter keys were not yet invented and printer's type was still being used. Printer's type required typing on a flat surface. We have graded this Calagraph No 2 as a 2,2.

The Calagraph Number 1 and Number 2 each came out in the early 1880s making them very early typewriters and along with the first Hammonds were the 2nd and 3rd sucessful keyboard typewriters to enter the market about 8 years after the first typewriter (Sholes & Glidden) in 1873.

$1150.00

SOLD


Fox Model 24

This beautiful Fox visible machine was fully restored about 20 years ago. We believe it is the one in the photograph on page 133 of Michal Adler's Antique Typewriters, From Creed to Qwerty. It has since lost the front nut cover and has incurred a few minor scratches but is otherwise in very good condition and we would estimate its condition rating at 2,2. It was most likely manufactured in 1906-1907.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and there is an additional $75 international shipping fee for anywhere outside of the USA.

$675.00

SOLD


Jost Model 4 serial # 54449

George Washington Newton Jost is often given credit for saving the the first S&G typewriter and the entire fragile new typewriter industry. In early 1873 Jost came on the scene when Sholes and Densmore could not successfully and repeatedly produce working S&Gs. It was Jost who had the idea and actually introduced the contract manufacturing concept to Philco and Eliphalet Remington Jr. (Old Eliphalet Remington's sons). Jost must have had an early equity interest in the S&G and it was probably diluted down as new investors, new models and other changes took place over the next two decades.

This Jost Number 4 has been fully restored and was built around 1895. Jost's typewriter designs evolved from his involvement with that first S&G in 1873 to this machine some 20 years later. This is the machine in the photograph on page 57 of Adler's From Creed to Qwerty by Schiffer published in 1997. We have estimated its condition rating as a 1,3 in that it is not working as well as it should.

$1085.00

SOLD


Burroughs 1931 Typewriter

Burroughs was huge in banking, business adding machines and calculators as well as other business machines so it was just natural that they would come out with a typewriter. Never the less, they clearly stumbled with thier new product. They first came out with a manual model in 1931 and then an early electric verison (all the electric motor did was advance the carriage) in 1932 but by 1936 they were out of the typewriter business. It was probably the depression that really caused their typewriter failure since the machine itself was a pretty good one using proven contempory designs of other sucessful typewriters of the time.

Therefore, today Burroughs typewriters are a little scarce. This one is the early manual and seems to be working well and generally as intended. It definitely could use a good cleaning so you are buying it as is. We couldn't find a serial number on it so that can be your first challenge after the purchase.

$225.00

SOLD


Remington 6 serial #8065 Typewriter

This Remington 6 (serial number 8065) antique typewriter is without a doubt the best Remington 6 I have ever offered for sale. Its' very low serial number indicates it was made in 1895 and just the second year of manufacture. It is in exceptional condition. All of its graphics (writings, decorations and pin stripping) are clear and easy to see and to read. It is in very good operating condition and is fully working as intended. It is an early understrike machine meaning it strikes on the bottom of the platen and is not readily visible to the typist. While it could use a good cleaning (dusty and dirty from 120 years in dry storage), the only issue I can find is that it will need a new ribbon if one intends to actually type with it, otherwise it is in very good condition and I would estimate its conditional rating at 2,2.

There is free shipping to anywhere within the USA and there would be an additional $150 USPS Priority International Shipping charge to anywhere else in the world.

$375.00

SOLD


Remington No 7 serial# 105,461

One of the last Remington understrike keyboard typewriters. This machine was manufactured in 1902 and was obsolete only six years later when Remingtion introduced thier first visible typewriters. Today, we would probably be happy to have six years before obsolesence but back then it was unusual. This machine is in very good condition in that all pinstripping and lettering is bright and easy to read. It has its two Remington Sunbust labels and each is bright and in good condition. The typewriter has good action and all of its functioning parts. We would estime its condition as a 2,2. It no longer has its' oak base but does still come with its orignial tin cover.

There is free shipping anywhere in the USA and an additional $100 for anywhere outside of the USA.

$485.00

SOLD


Caligraph #3 Antique Typewriter

This Caligraph No 3 antique typewriters dates to the mid 1880s. It is complete but not working. It does need a good cleaning and probably some adjustment to work as intended.

The Caligraph typewriter was (arguably) the second typewriter and first introduced in 1881. This typewriter was before the caps key was invented and had both a upper and lower case keyboard. Also, the roller platen had flat surfaces all around because printers print (requiring flat striking surfaces) was used on the typewriter and before curved typewriter print.

$350.00

SOLD


Victor Keyboard Typewriter serial#6976

This is a nice early Victor keyboard with a low serial number. It was a product of the Victor Typewriter Company which bought out the old Franklin Typewriter Company in 1907, discounted the Franklin and introduced the Victor. Because of the lower serial number, we estimate this machine was likely made in 1907 or 1908. It could use a good cleaning and it is fully functional. There is no case for this machine. We have estimated its condition rating as a 2,2.

Our price below includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and there is an additional charge of $50 for shipping via US Priority International mail anywhere outside of the USA.

$325.00

SOLD


Bing No 2 Portable Typewriter serial# 1634728

This Bing No 2 is German and comes with its original case and was made in the early 1920s, but it does speak English well. It has a good Art Deco look. It has a condition rating of 2,3 and is not currently functioning as intended This is the machine in the photograph appearing on page 102 of Adler's 1997, From Creed To Qwerty

$325.00

SOLD


Cash Typograph Typewriter - Auction Over

Click on Photograph to access more photos

This is the machine in the photograph on page 110 and described on page 135 of Adler's Antique Typewriters, From Creed to QWERTY. It is a historically important machine and the only flat screen platen typewriter ever made. It was designed and manufactured by its inventor Arthur Wise Cash in Hartford, Connecticut in 1887. There was very limited production and very few machines have survived to today. We know of three other specimans and are sure there are a few others out there. Because of its historical importance and rarity, we would guess its value and desirability to be similar to that of an Oliver Model 1 or an electric Blick.

This particular machine is in its all original condition except for the key tabs and the cloth on the platen. We replaced those for display purposes but the original key tops and the original platen material does come with the machine. The balance of the machine is original and in excellent condition. The machine was working but after being idle for about ten years is not now functioning or, more likely, I just forgot how to operate it. Because I can't seem to make it function and because I believe all parts are present, I am estimating its condition rating at a 2,3. However, you are buying the machine "as is" so please do check it out carefully before bidding.

We have had offers of $25,000 for this machine in the past when it was not then available for sale. This sale is in an auction format. We will accept bids (email or telephone) from March 17 thru March 31 and now plan to end the auction at 5:00 PM on March 31. However, we will continue to accept bidding until we reasonablly determine the bidding has ended. We are happy to send additional photos and/or jpgs on request and the machine is available here for inspection from 10:00AM to 5:00PM daily except Wednesdays and Thursdays when it would then be available only via an appointment.

The minimum opening bid is $25,000 and only subsquent bids in increments of $500 or more will be accepted. As bids are made we will adjust the price below to reflect the last bid price. We also will post updates in this section as bids are received. If a minimum opening bid of $25,000 is not tendered then the machine will be available on this web site with a price of $25,000 for a limited time. We may then offer the machine on Ebay in an auction format.

Payment must be in US dollars and only wire transfer, bank cashier's check or certified check are acceptable unless other agreeable arrangements had been made in advance of bidding. It is expected that payment will be tendered within 3 business days following notification of the winning bid. Otherwise, the underbidder (if any) will be awarded the winning bid. Shipping, packing and insurance is the buyer's responsibility. We are happy to assist in any reasonable way including free delivery to our local UPS Store, which we can highly recommend.

SOLD AUCTION HAS ENDED

$25000.00

SOLD


US Signal Corps WW2 Teletype Machine

The price was reduced on 12/4/2012 from $925 to $740

The US Army Signal Corp's teletype typewriter was the US major method of military communication during WW2 and was the US equivalent to the famous German enigma machine. While the enigma actually calculated the encoding and the decoding of military messages as they were typed, US coding was performed manually prior to being typed and then again manually decoded after being received on the other end. After several generations of communication technology obsolescence, most WW2 vintage teletype typewriters ended in the scrap heap. Because of their souvenir value and collectible status, more enigma machines probably survived to today than did teletype typewriters. Does that mean that a WW2 vintage teletype typewriter is rarer today than is a enigma machine?

This machine is in wonderful condition and still has its original US Army Signal Corps shipping case. Of course, in order to truly test out this typewriter you would first have to first hook it up to a oceanic submerged cable. It is definitely from WW2 and does have some early 1940s date marks. Our price below is for store pick up only but local delivery or UPS shipment is available, so please call for a quote.

$740.00

SOLD


Hall Index Typewriter (New York) serial # 1576

The price was reduced on 12/4/2012 from $2,050 to $1,500, we further reduced our price on 9/17/2013 to $1,275

This was the first index typewriter. It was introduced in 1881 even though it was mostly developed in the 1860s. These first Hall machines were made in and marked New York and shortly thereafter they were made in and marked Salem, Mass. This Hall also has an early serial number (1576). If you look closely at the stylus used to indicate the letter to be typed, you might realize you are probably looking at the very first mouse. The price differential on this Hall, and the next one made and marked Salem, Mass, is almost entirely due to the earlier nature of this New York model vs the Salem model. Our condition rating on this machine is 2,2.

$1130.00

SOLD


Odell No 2 Index Typewriter serial # 34407

The Odell was invented by Levi Judson Odell in 1889. First models were made in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin and sported a wonderful American Indian design. The company soon moved to Chicago and that is where this particular machine was made. It is of the linear design and has its original type bar and comes with its original case. It is the machine photographed and pictured on page 158 of Michael Adlers' From Creed to Qwerty, published by Schiffer in 1997.
This machine is all original except for the paper index which was replaced. The action is slow and its estimated condition rating is 2,2-.

$1350.00

SOLD


Corona Standard

Corona Standard four bank portable typewriter is a grey color. condition rating 2,2

$85.00

SOLD


Blue Folding Corona 3 Portable Typewriter

From This Olde Office collection: I think I started off more antique typewriter collectors with a cute folding Corona 3 than with any other collectible typewriter. They are readily available in the black color but colored versions are more difficult to find.

This blue, Corona Special, 3 bank, folding portable typewriter is labeled with the LC Smith & Corona Typewriters, Inc name indicating it was after the LC Smith and the Corona merger in 1927 so we are estimating its date to 1927 since it has both names displayed.

This machine does easily fold as intended but the carriage is not advancing when keys or the space bar are struck. There are small paint losses but the graphics are clear and easy to read. We have estimated its condition rating at 2-3.

$125.00

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Smith Corona Skywriter

Smith Corona Skywrtier four bank portable typewriter. condition rating 2,2.

$85.00

SOLD


Very Early Blickensderfer Model 5 Serial# 2002

This is a very early Blick. It never had a metal name plate like most of the later Blicks. The name and model of the machine was hand painted. We have restored it and replaced the hand lettering so as to be identical to the original lettering. Its serial number 2002 is quite low by its self but if you look closely at the first "2" digit in the photo you can tell it is suspicious and it may have been added or changed. It was common for the first units out of production, or even prototypes that were intended to be subsquently sold, to have serial numbers beginning with 1,000 or 2,000. The serial number on this machine looks like it may have originally been 1002 and then changed to 2002. Perhaps thinking a 2002 serial number would look less prototypish than 1002? While there are known Blicks with serial numbers less than 1,000 the very first ones before mass production of the model began may have had arbitary and subsquently duplicated serial numbers. If that is true in this case, then this particular Blick 5 may have been at that 1893 Chicago Columbia Exhibition. It does have the Scientific keyboard layout. It is in very good and fully restored condition and we would estimate its conditional rating as a 2,2. It comes with its original oak case and an original extra replacement type ball.

$650.00

SOLD


American Index Typewriter

A very simple typewriter with only 35 parts. It was patented and introduced in 1893. It uses a rubber type pad that usually is missing since rubber quickly deteriorates after about 40 years. Somehow, the print pad on this typewriter has survived. We have fully restored this machine and its metal case. condition rating 2+,2.

$1150.00

SOLD


Draper Typewriter serial#41825

The Draper Typewriter was the private label that The Chicago Writing Machine Company made for Sears and for Montgomery Ward right at the turn-of-the-century. It is in essence the same as the first model Chicago with The Draper name. Strangly enough, it is much more scarce than the Chicago or even its predessor The Munson Typewriter. This one is in very good condition and is all original. We only cleaned and oiled this machine. We estimate its condition rating as a 2,2.

$1425.00

SOLD


American Index Typewriter

This American is in "as found" condition and does not have a case. Its' rubber type pad is missing and the type index does not move. It needs a good cleaning and we have given it a condition rating of 3,4. This would be an excellent canditate for restoration.

$525.00

SOLD


Royal Quiet Deluxe

Royal Quiet Deluxe condition rating 2,2

$85.00

SOLD


Caligraph Sewing Machine Style Typewriter Stand

We recently found this typewriter stand at an antique store in Southern Vermont. I certainly knew of, and have seen, similar Sholes & Glidden stands but I was of the opinion that by the time the Caligraph came out in 1881 the sewing machine stand was obsolete. I guess not. There is no tredle so that was obviously gone by that time. The stand originally had a drop leaf oak shelf and that is missing but could be replaced pretty easily. It has its original cast iron sides spelling out Caligraph on both ends and its original oak table top.

We have a Caligraph 2 sitting on it in the photo but it probably was designed for the smaller Caligraph 1. The stand is approximately 25 inches high, 24 inches long and 16 inches deep.

The stand could be taken apart and packed for shipment if desired and delivery or shipping is extra. Please email or call for a quote?

$450.00

SOLD


Corona Standard

Corona Standard 4 Bank portable typewriter in its original carrying case. Its condition rating is 2,2.

$88.00

SOLD


Hammond Multiplex Typewriter

This Antique Hammond Multiplex Typewriter is complete with its original case. However, and what is very rare, it comes with its original wooden shipping crate that was used to ship this typewriter to its first and only owner sometime around 1915. The typewriter is in "as found" but pretty good condition. It could use a good cleaning and oiling but as is we rate it as a 2-,3+

$450.00

SOLD


Blickensderfer No 5 serial# 59315

This Blick 5 has the unique Blickensder Scienfific Keyboard and all of its parts and components are present. The keys operate but the carriage is sluggish and needs adjustment. The machine also displays some light rust and paint loss but we believe it to be totally restorable without having to replacement important components. We estimate its rating at a 3-,3- and it comes with its original oak case.

$225.00

SOLD


YU ESS Index Typewriter serial # 51014

This YU ESS typewriter was made by the German company Mignon although it states USA on the machine. It was made exclusively for the US market and the "YU ESS" is the way the German manufacturer spelled "US". The "Star of David" symbol was added since they apparently thought most American business men of the time were Jewish. The action on this machine is very smooth and we estimated its rating at a 2,2+.

$775.00

SOLD


Oliver No 5 Typewriter serial #198177

From Michael,s collection comes this nice Oliver Model 5 antique typewriter, serial #198177. The Oliver was arguably the best made typewriter and often considered indestructible. I recall reading an old Oliver salesman's manual wherein one chapter describes how the salesman should carry an Oliver into a large office area and in the middle of the secretarial pool, fake a stumble and drop the machine on the wood floor. Then, as the people in the area gather around, pick up the machine and exhibit how it is still functioning well. Then the salesman was instructed to say "Of course it still works, its an Oliver"

This model 5, (circa: 1906) is in very nice condition. The cast iron frame is intact and without any breaks, cracks or repairs. All the original paint is present with less than 1% loss. All the original graphics are present, clear and easy to read. There is a little surface tarnish on some of the bright metal but most is clear and bright. This machine still has both of its original ribbon spool covers which are often missing. The key tabs are a bit dirty and the machine could use a good cleaning.

This machine is fully functioning as intended. All the keys strike the platen and return to rest without assistance. The carriage advances as the keys and space bar are struck. We have estimated the condition rating on this machine at 2-,2.

$100.00

SOLD


Merritt Index Typewriter item # 1643

We estimate this Merritt Index Typewriter to have been made in 1899. The original case lid is missing but we had a custom plexiglas lid made to fit and it also serves as an excellent display case. This machine is in excellent condtion with a rating of 2+,2.

$1250.00

SOLD


Victor Index Typewriter serial # 3410

Price was reduced on 12/4/2012 from $4,150 to $3,025

This Victor was made around 1899 and there are not a lot of survivors. The carriage moves freely. The index moves freely but it does not engage the print wheel. We are not sure if it just needs an adjustment or is missing a part. The space and type bars do appear to work. Also, there doesn't appear to be any inking device present. Since it is not working we have given it a condition rating of 2,4.

$2550.00

SOLD


Wellington No 1 serial # 17435

This old Wellington was made by the Williams Manufacturing Company of Plattsburg, New York which is less than 75 miles from where we are here in Brandon, Vermont. It was made in 1897, give or take a year or two. It does display an 1892 patent date. The machine could use a good cleaning and polishing in that it does show tarnish on the bright metal parts. It is functional but a bit sluggish. We have estimated its condition rating at a 2-.2-. It still has its wood base and tin cover. The handle on the cover is a classic 1890s design.

Our price includes free shipping anywhere within the USA and an additional charge of $60 to ship it via US Priority International Mail anywhere outside of the USA.

$325.00

SOLD


Hammond Model One serial#9980

This is the first model Hammond introduced in the early 1880s. Notice it has ebony keys encased in mahogony and it's full and complete wooden case still with the instructions glued to the bottom of the lid. This machine is very clean and shows and operates very well. We have given this early machine a 2+,2+ rating.

$2150.00

SOLD


ROFA 4

The Rofa 4 was made in Germany in 1923 by Robert Fahig GmbH. It's not a rare machine but not that easy to find either. Since it is a cute little typewriter, it is therefore collectible. The condition rating on this machine is a 2,2.

$485.00

SOLD


World Index Typewriter

The World index typewriter was patented by John Becker of Boston in 1886 and manufactured by The World Typewriter Company of Maine. This machine does not have its original case but it does come with a custom made plexiglas display case. As is usual, it does not have its rubber type pad but otherwise it is in very good condition and we estimate its rating at 2+,2.

$965.00

SOLD


American Visible Index Typewriter

The price was reduced on 12/4/2012 from $1,750 to $1,400

The American Visible and the American Index are two separate machines. The Visible is slighly earlier and dates back to around 1891. The American Visible is definitely more scarce than the American Index and there are not a lot of good surviving specimens around but this is one of them. This machine still has its rubber type pad but it is not attached. The carriage is slow to move and the typewriter needs some adjustments. We have estimated this machines' condition rating at a 2,3. By the way, this particular machine is the one pictured on page 98 of Michael Adlers' From Creed to Qwerty published in 1997 by Schiffer. We definitely recommend Michaels' book for all typewriter collectors and for anyone interersted in typewriter history.

$1250.00

SOLD


Simplex Special Demonstrated Model S item# 4TOO11

This is a Special Simplex Demonstrated Model S (I wonder what "special demonstrated meant?). It comes in its original card board box and has a condition rating of 2,2.

There is an extra $20 shipping charge anywhere outside the US.

$65.00

SOLD


Home Blick serial# 169,807

The Home Blick was the private label for Montgomery Ward. This one is in very good condition and we have estimated its rating at 2,2. It still has its very interesting wooden carrying case which has a special compartment for typing paper and for a typewriting instruction book.

$465.00

SOLD


Peoples Index Typewriter

This Peoples does still have its original wooden carrying case. We believe it was made around 1893. This is the machine in the photograph on page 162 of Michael Adlers' From Creed To Qwerty published by Schiffer in 1997.While the carriage is slow to advance it does appear to be working. We estimate its condition rating as a 2,2-

$1250.00

SOLD


Hammond Model Two serial# 30934

This early Model Two has the ideal keyboard (curved keyboard) and notice that it has all of its key tops without any of them being broken or chipped which is often the case with these early plastic ideal keyboard key tabs. This is a very clean machine with its original full oak case with the instructions still glued in the bottom of the lid. It has an excellent action and we grade this machine as a 2+,2+.

$1150.00

SOLD


Blickensderfer No 7 serial# 121857

The model 7 came out around 1897. This machine has the Scientific Keyboard layout and its original oak case. All the keys and carriage work as intended but the type wheel needs an adjustment otherwise we would estimate this machine to be a 2,2-.

$375.00

SOLD


Chicago Typewriter serial# 23262

The Chicago was the successor of the 1890 Munson typewriter. The inventory and the intellectural rights were sold in 1897 to a new company named The Chicago Writing Machine Company and in 1898 the typewriter name was also changed to The Chicago and this is a first model of that Chicago Typewriter. It still has its original oak case as well as its original cleaning kit and oil can both in its small wooden box, see photos. This machine is entirely original and only has been cleaned and oiled. The art work is clear and easily read. It very clearly states patent dates of 1889, 1891 and 1892. While it is sluggish from lack of use we are estimateing its condition rating as 2,2 and believe it to be in very good condition.

$1450.00

SOLD


Fay Sho No 7

This was the famous product of the sons of Christopher Sholes the inventor of the first typewriter and of E. Remington & Sons the manufacturer of the first typewriter. Zalmon Shoes was the designer and Franklin Remington was the general manufacturer of Fay-Sholes Typewriter Company. The typewriter was originally called the Rem-Sho but lost lawsuits thus preventing the use of the competitor's name "Remington" so they changed it to Fay-Sho and sometimes Fay-Sholes was also used. Fay came from Charles N. Fay the president of the Fay-Sholes Typewriter Company. Eventually, they won a Supreme Court decided appeal and reverted back to the Rem-Sho name.

We couldn't locate a serial number on this particular understrike machine but believe it was manufactured around 1904. It is in rough condition and what a real estate agent might call a "fixer upper". The left carriage knob is missing and the right one is missing a large chunk. Otherwise, it does appear that most, if not all the other, parts are present. It is not currently working and does have some tarnish. We have estimated its condition as a 4,4. We do believe it to be fully restorable.

The price below include free shipping anywhere in the USA and there is an additional charge of $75 for shipping anywhere outside of the USA.

$325.00

SOLD


Pittsburg Visible Model 10

The Pittsburg Visible was a later model of the 1890 Daugherty-Visible. While it is not clearly marked, I believe this one to be a model 10 which was introduced in 1902. The Daugherty and Pittsburg visibles were really the first successful visible (vs understrike) typewriters. The idea was to give clear and easy visibility to the typist of what she was typing as she was typing it.

This machine is in "as found" condition meaning we have not even cleaned it. All the parts appear present and the typewriter is working but the carriage is sluggish and several keys are sticky to the platen. It does have light tarnish but we believe it to be a good canadate for restoration or at least cleaning, lubricating and adjustment. We have estimated its condition rating as a 3,3. The number 10633 is scratched on the bottom of the frame and it is probably the serial number. This machine does come with its original tin lid and oak base.

The shipping is free to anywhere within the US but there is an additional S&H charge of $100 to insure and to ship overseas via US Priority International Mail.

$925.00

SOLD


Brass Underwood Typewriter serial s740441

This is an all brass vintage Underwood Typewriter. It probably was a specially made typewriter specficially for shipboard use. Brass corodes less rapiddily than other metals and was often used when anticipating significant exposure to salt water. This Brass Underwood is in very good condition and we have estimated its condition rating as a 2,2.

The shipping and insurance is free anywhere in the US and an additional charge of $60 for shipping via US Priority International anywhere else.

$625.00

SOLD


Mignon Model 2

Index typewriting technology was pretty much obsoleted after the turn-of-the-century by the introduction of several inexpensive sheet metal keyboard typewriters. The Mignon of Germany was one of the exceptions. It was manufactured from 1903 into the early 1930s. It was advertised that a Mignon could type faster than contemporary keyboard machines since both hands could be used. Before the touch system of typing it was pretty much hunt and peck and usually with only one hand. This machine is an earlier Mignon and was manufactured around 1905. It has its original case and is all original except that the paper tray has been restored. The action on this machine is extraordinarily smooth. We estimate its rating at 2,2+.

$1450.00

SOLD


Franz Wagner Underwood Model One Typewriter

This Underwood Typewriter is marked "manufactured by Wagner Typewriter Company" and with various patent dates of 1890, 1891, 1894 & 1896. It has serial number 13,001 and one has to wonder if they started this series of typewriters with serial number 13,000? It is most likely a Model One but I am not sure of the difference between a Model One and a Model Two, both were made at the same time and for only one year during 1896. It is in good condition and all parts are present but it does require adjustments since the keys are sticky and the carriage is sluggish. Therefore, we have given it a condition rating of 2,3.

Franz Wagner was the inventor and patent holder on his "Wagner" typewriter and he was also a major contributor for various elements of the Caligraph, Densmore, Stearns and Jost typewriters. He sold his Wagner typewriter patent in 1895 to John T. Underwood who was a manufacturer and suppler of carbon paper and typewriter ribbons. The Wagner Typewriter Company continued to make the Underwood typewriter for a year or so until they changed over to the new Underwood Typewriter Company. This is one of those machines made during that short period of time.

The Underwood typewriter became incredibly popular with millions of them made over a 50 year period and while there were several different models they all pretty much look alike. When most people think of a manual desk top typewriter it is usually the Underwood that comes to mind. Unfortunately, for those reasons, the Underwood is not generally considered a very collectible typewriter unless there is something very special or unique about a particular specimen. This Franz Wagner Underwood may be one of those exceptions. We only have three Underwoods currently in our collections: This Franz Wagner machine, the Hooven Automatic Typewriter (a modified Underwood 3) and the brass plated shipboard Underwood.

Shipping and insurance is free to anywhere within the US and there is an extra $60 charge to ship via US Priority International anywhere else.

$565.00

SOLD


Caligraph Number 4

CALAGRAPH NO 4 TYPEWRITER circa: 1880s The Calagraph was the second typewriter to find commercial success with the No 1 introduced in 1881 and Model No 2 later in that same year and the model 4 shortly thereafter. The platten on this machine has flat surfaces because curved typewriter type was not yet invented and printer's type, requiring flat surfaces, was used. Also, there are both lower and upper case keyboards since the shift key was not yet invented. This machine has been fully and beautifully restored.

$1000.00

SOLD


Franklin Typewriter serial# 10201

This is the Franklin pictured on page 75 of Adler's Antique Typewriters, From Creed to QWERTY, 1997 by Schiffer. While it does have a paper decal indicating "New Franklin" on its paper tray it has the script Franklin on its face shield and the serial number (10201) indicates that it is probably a Type IV and not a Type III (Richard Dickerson's cataloging system).

The Franklin patent was applied for in 1888 by Wellington Parker Kidder of Boston who went on to invent other sucessful typewriters including the one bearing his name "Wellington". The first Franklins appear on the market in 1891 and were manufactured by The Franklin Typewriter Company. The last Franklin Typewriter was manufactured in Boston in 1907 when the company was purchased by the Victor Typewriter Company of New York and the Franklin was phased out.

This machine is in very good condition. Its original tin lid is present and has been restored. The typewriter is operable but it does need some adjustment. All the components are present but some keys are sticky and the carriage moves irregularity. We have estimated the condition rating for this machine to be a 2,2-

We have free shipping on this machine anywhere in the United States but there is an additional charge of $100 to pack, insure and ship it overseas via US Priority International.

$1925.00

SOLD


New Century Caligraph Number 6 seria l# 21931

This New Century Caligraph No 6 (serial#21931) is the one in the photograph on page 157 of Adler's Antique Typewriters From Creed to Qwerty, 1997 by Schiffer. It is in great original condition and we have estimated its conditional rating at 2,2. It comes with its original tin case and original oak base. We did repaint the tin lid for presentation purposes. This machine was manufactured right around the turn-of-the-century (19th century), let's say 1900. It was designed by Walter J. Barron for the American Typewriter Company and was an effort to modernize the older elongated predecessor Caligraph versions, hence the name "New Century". It has seven banks of keys, (three rows for capital and three for lower case and one for numbers) and was advertised as "no need to shift keys".

While this was a serious attempt to modernize the Caligraph it missed on probably the most important modern typewriter trend of the time, visible typing. The New Century Caligraph No 6 is an understrike machine and for that reason alone was only around for a short time. It was discontinued in 1908 when the predecessor manufacturer (The Union Typewriter Company) discontinued it in favor of a visible typewriter. The New Century Caligraph is actually scarcer than the other older Caligraph versions (excepting, of course, for the Caligraph Model One).

The price below includes free S&H for anywhere within the USA and since this is a rather large and heavy machine (especially with the tin lid and oak base) there is an additional charge of $100 for S&H&Insurance via US Priority International Mail for anywhere outside of the USA.

$825.00

SOLD


Lambert Model One serial # 2841

These early Lambert Index Typewriters remind me of vintage bakelite telephones. But, there is no connection. This is the earlier model and often called the Lambert Model One by collectors but the Company never gave it that designation. However, it is the earlier and first model made by its' inventor Frank Lambert of Brooklyn, New York in the late 1890s. The Lambert model one is the featured typewriter on the cover of Michael Adlers' book From Creed To Qwerty published in 1997 by Schiffer. This particular machine has it all, it is in great shape (we easily give it a 2+,2 rating), it still has its wooden carrying case with a clear and beautiful decal of the planet Saturn, original instruction booklet, a spare ink pad, an 1890s ink bottle, oil can and celluloid cleaning brush. On October 30, 2010 we reduced the price from $2,150.oo and on January 18, 2011 we further reduced the price to $1,400.

$1375.00

SOLD


Helios Klimax Keyboard Typewriter

This particular machine was manufactured and first sold around 1914. We did find a number (1932) on the typeball which may or may not be the serial number given to this machine by its manufacturer, A. Ney of Berlin, Germany. It is a type ball machine with only two rows of keys. Each key can represent 4 different characters and is operated by none or one of three seperate shift keys.

This typewriter is in it's all original condition and has never been restored. Still, it is in very good condition with at least 99.5% of its original paint and pin stripping remaining and it is fully functional. We have estimated it's conditional rating as a 2,2.

There is free shipping and insurance any where within the USA and an additional charge of $65 to ship and insure any where outside of the USA.

$1425.00

SOLD


Hall Index Typewriter (Salem Mass) serial # 7893

This is the Salem, Mass model and there truly is not much difference between it and the New York model other that the two engravings, one on the front of the typewriter and the other on the box escutcheon. The key to the case is still with this machine and the lock does work. We have rated the condition on this machine as a 2,2.

$1100.00

SOLD


Royal Standard, serial #41391

As a typewriter collector, how many times did someone tell you that they have a valuable old Royal? It seems more people have old Royals than anything else. Of course, I have to tell them that since Royal was relatively late on the scene and not introduced until 1906 they generally are not very collectible. Also, since they were so prolific they are not very rare. Of course, there are some exceptions. The Model 10 introduced in 1915 and similar models with the plate glass panels appear interesting to a lot of people, not necessarily to typewriter collectors. The first model is historically note worthy and therefore collectible. This is the first model Royal and is called the flatbed by collectors. While it did not have a model number designation it is often referred to as the model one. This particular machine is serial 41391 and lists the last patent date in 1910 which is probably the year it was made since the next model (the Number 5) came out in 1911. Condition rating 2,2 There is free shipping anywhere within the USA and an additional charge of $65 to ship and insure for anywhere outside of the USA.

$345.00

SOLD


Smith Premier No 1

The Smith Premier typewriter started what would become one of the most important sagas in typewriter history. Lyman C. Smith in 1888 purchased the rights to the Smith Premier One typewriter from its inventor, Alexander Timothy Brown. Smith was the owner of the L.C. Smith Gun Company in Syracuse, New York and, like Remington, was looking for non firearm products since the civil war was over and the market for guns was greatly diminished. After the Civil War, surplus guns were abundent and they were quite inexpensive. At this time in American history, except for a few niche markets, firearms manufacturing was at best a troubled industry. Smith must have seen or heard of the sucess of the Remington typewriter transaction and set off making the first Smith Premier typewriters.

The Smith Priemers enjoyed great success but around the turn-of-the-century visible typewriting was becomming the prefered choice. Smith Premiers were understrikes, meaning their keys struck the bottom of the platen and not the top of the platen like the more modern typewriters of the time did. Lyman tried to convence his board (and the Typewriter Trust) to allow him to retool and come out with visible typwriter models, but it didn't happen. His ultimate reaction was to quit his company, recruit his brothers and start the L.C.Smith typewriter Company in Syracuse, New York with The L.C. Smith & Bros No 2 as their first typewriter. This typewriter and its successor models enjoyed great success.

Then in 1927 they merged (they really bought) the Corona Typewriter Company and formed the LC Smith & Bros & Corona Tyepwriter Company which was quickly renamed to the Smith Corona and eventually to the SCM Corporation. There was 100 years of manual typewriter manufacturing in the United States with the first manual being the S&G in 1874 and last being a SCM manual portable in 1974.

This Smith Premier No 1 dates to 1890 and has been restored to its beautiful original condition and sports the Victorian engraved marsh and cattail motifs. This is the machine in the photograph on page 81 of Adler's From Creed to Qwerty by Schiffer in 1997. It comes with its restored tin case and has a condition rating of 2,3.

$1250.00

SOLD


Edison Mimeograph Typewriter Model No 1

The circa: 1892 Edison Model One Mimeograph Typewriter. This is an index typewriter that was developed to type wax stencils for the Edison Mimeograph duplicating machine manufactured and distributed by A.B. Dick. There is some disagreement as to if Edison really invented this typewriter or not. He claimed he did not invent it and merely let A.B. Dick put his name on it. This was a very slow index typewriter that did not type well and functioned with invisible typing, meaning that one could not see what they were typing so they had to lift up the carriage to inspect the work. Most contemporary typewriters of the time could cut stencils and also typed well but the Edison could only cut the stencil well and typed poorly and still cost about the same as a keyboard typewriter. Also, the other leading typewriter manufactures of the time were known to pressure their distributors not to carry the A.B. Dick Edison Mimeograph Typewriter nor the Edison Mimeograph Duplicator products until the typewriter was withdrawn from the market. This pressure, and the fact the product concept was flawed to begin with, apparently worked and the typewriter disappeared from the market place in 1897. Edison is known to have as early as the late 1880s rebuff others who requested he lend his name to a new typewriter. He claimed it was an easy project and he could quickly develop one with significant improvements over the competition whenever he wanted. I personally think he did have a hand in the development of this typewriter and then distanced himself and his brand from a failed and flawed product.

This particular specimen, serial number 1429 (not quite sure this is a serial number or not but we did find it on the machine), is the one photographed and appearing on page 123 of Michael Adler's From Creed to Qweerty published by Schiffer in 1997. We have estimated its condition as a 2-,2- and it is fully restorable. It also comes with a reproduced vintage instruction booklet.

$9750.00

SOLD


Smith Premier No 2

This Smith Premier No 2 was made around the turn-of-the century and is a good example of changes often made in second models. The most obvious being cost reduction. In this case, notice that the beautiful Victorian engraved cattails and marshes decorating the model one are absent in this model two. Also, more servicability was built into second models vs the first ones. This machine has been restored and comes with its restored original carring case. It has a condition rating of 2+,3.

$725.00

SOLD


Smith Premier One Ribbon Tin

This is an original Smith Premier One replacement ribbon tin. It comes with a replacement spool and ribbon inside. I has wonderfu graphics and displays the Smith Premier One typewriter. It is a great go with for a Smith Premier One antique typewriter. circa 1890s and condition rating of 2,2.

$125.00

SOLD


Sholes & Glidden serial # A1119

This is the grand daddy of them all; The Sholes & Glidden typewriter commonly refered as an "S&G". The S&G is generally accepted as the first commercially successful typewriter and was introduced late in 1873 and most collectors accept 1874 as the first year of introduction. When this machine was new, it was very well decorated with Victorian hunt scenes or of Victorian ladies or of other period subjects. The first machines were on trendle sewing machine stands since the Remington Arms Company in Ilion, New York, was the contract manufacturer and they used an old arms plants that had since been converted to sewing machine production. Apparently, one of the sewing machine manufacturing engineers had a hand in early production runs, and hence the trendle which was only used to advance the carriage. The trendle stands were not around for long and the carriage level was soon added.

Early machines were often sent back to the factory for servicing and for new feature enhancements, such as adding the carriage level. There were also overhaul and reconditioning services provided by the factory. This machine has an "A" serial number prefix which indicates it was one of the early mahinces refurbished at the factory and one of the common procedures of the time was to dip strip the machine and repaint it. When they did that they did not replace the original hand painted decorations but simply added some pinstripping over the newly painted black machine.

Some of the most important names involved in the early typewriter industry had some hand in the S&G including but not limited to Sholes, Glidden, Remington, Densmore and Yost.

Sometime around 1878, the S&G was replaced with the Remington Perfected Type Writer No 2 and that is the first time Remington and a model number was identified with a typewriter and also the reason the S&G is sometimes referred to as a Remington No 1.

Do you know the first book to be written on a S&G typewriter? It was a transcript copy of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. Samuel Clemens was one of the few, if not the only, early celebreties to use an S&G. He did give a few testimonials to using a typewriter and they were in his special humorous manner. One went something like: "I emplore you never to buy and or use a typewriter, for if you do you will find yourself corresponding with old friends and new acquaintances alike. You will end up with so many friends and associates you will not know what to do with them all."

This S&G may not look like it, but it is in fairly good shape and is very restorable. I would recommend that it be restored and to replace the original Victorian decorations. Notice the wooden key levels and one, the comma, did break but can easily be repaired. We have estimated the condition rating to be a 4,4 but again, believe it to be very restorable and certainly worthy of restoration.

$10650.00

SOLD


Active Index Typewriter

This typewriter was made in Germany by Gustav Tietze AG around 1913. It was made under the name AKTIV for the German market and under the name Active for the English market. We estimate its condition rating as a 2,2.

$450.00

SOLD


Standard Folding Type-Bar Visible Writing Typewriter

Yes, that is the correct name. It was designed and patented by Frank S Rose of New York in 1904. Unfortunately, Frank died in 1905 and his son George picked up the work and started manufactuing in 1908. The name of the company was the Rose Typewriter Company.
In 1909 the rights were puchased and a new company was formed and named the Standard Typewriter Company in Groton New York. In 1911 the typewriter was changed to a black sheet metal three bank folding typewriter and named the Corona 3. In 1914 the company name was changed to Corona. See the Smith Premier One for the full story of Smith Corona and 100 years of manual typewriting history.

This Standard Folding typewriter is often thought of as the prototype for the incredibily popular Corona 3 folding typewriter. Its' serial number is 665 and we date it to aroung 1905. The condition rating is a 2,3-.

$485.00

SOLD


Williams No 6 Typewriter serial#37087

The Williams typewriter is often referred to as the grasshopper because the type keys resemble grasshopper legs when in operation. It was invented by John Newton Williams of Brooklyn, New York. Newton started applying for patents in 1875 but it wasn't until 1890 & 1891 that he finally achieved them and started manufacture. The No 6 was introduced in 1906 and was made for only a short period of time since the company went out of business in 1909. This machine has been fully restored and still has its original tin carrying case. It has a condition rating of 2,2.

$1350.00

SOLD


Commerical Visible Typewriter serial #25397

While there are one or two specimens of models other than Model 6 around, almost all surviving machines are the 6. The Commerical Visible Typewriter was first patented in 1899 by Richard W. Uhlig who is credited with up to 50 typewriter designs and improvements and it was manufactured by the Visible Typewriter Company of New York which previously did have a few name changes. It was only made and sold until 1908 when it then disappeared from the market place. This short life explains the relative scarcity of the Commercial Visible Typewriter. Surviving specimens are in the 22,000 to 25,000 serial number range.

It uses a type ball similar to the Blickendersfer but a hammer hits the paper from the rear and forces it against the ribbon. The Commerical Visible is a three bank machine

This particular machine has been fully restored including replacing all the art work so it now resembles what it was like when it was fresh off the factory floor. It still has its original wooded case. We have rated it as a 2+,2+.

$2650.00

SOLD


Junior serial# 4333

The Junior was probably the smallest keyboard typewriter ever made. It also was a popular war correspond typewriter and was known to be carried in combat by General MacArthur. This particular machine is the one in the photograph on page 146 of Adlers' From Creed To Qwerty by Schiffer published in 1997. It was manufactered around 1907 and comes in its original leather carrying case. It is in very good shape and has a condition rating of 2,2.

$575.00

SOLD


Postal Typewriter serial#26245

This particilar machine is the one in the photograph on page 169 of Micahael Adler's Antique Typewriters, From Creed To Qwerty
It is all original but has been cleaned and oiled. It is in very good condition and we estimate its rating at a 2,2. The Postal was the invention of Franklin Judge and William P. Quentell and based primarily on their patents of 1903. Its function is similar to that of the Blickensderfer in that it also uses an interchangable type ball. The Postal was made by The Postal Typewriter Company in New York and came out in 1908. This speciman was likely manufactured in 1909 or 1910.

$1125.00

SOLD


North's Typewriter serial# 2136

The North's typewriter was the invention of Morgan Donne and George Cooper who earned British patents for in 1890. However, it wasn't until two years later that it entered the market thanks to financing by the English Lord North. Unfortunately, Lord North died a short time later.

The North's is a four bank downstroke machine and most unusual due to its large paper roll holder. The type stroke is behind the platen and not visible. As the turn-of-the-century neared, invisable typing was clearly becomming obsolete. All of these negative features along with the lost of the financing source brought a quick end to the North's. It was only on the market a few years.

This machine is in very good condition and still has its original tin case. It is all original with clear graphics and good paint and all of its components. There does appear to be a repaired crack on the back and the bottom of the frame but it is not very noticeable and with the repair the frame is very solid. We have estimated its condition rating as a 2+,2.

There is free shipping to any where in the USA and any place outside the US has a $100 US Priority International Shipping and insurance charge.

$8350.00

SOLD


Liliput Index Typewriter Model 1

The top disc of this little index typewriter has three sections with one in English, one in French and one in German. It was probably made around 1907 by Justin Wilhelm Bamberger and Deutsche Kleinmaschinen-weke of Munich, Germany. These little machines are highly valued by collectors today. This one has an estimated rating of 3,3-.

$2250.00

SOLD


International Number 5 item # 1211

The International Number 5 was from around 1890 and is very similar to the Odell and to the Sun Dogbone index machines. While all three do have distinctively different forms, (the International is rectangular, the Odell is round and the Sun Dogbone is shaped like a ... you guess?) they have very similar and almost identical type bar mechanisms. As a way of caution, these type bars do not have any sort of locking devices to keep them on their respective machines so they are often missing. I have had cases for all three machines and they each required the type bar be removed for the machine to fit into the case and hence another reason they were frequently lost. As another word of caution, newly made replacement bars for the Odell were available a few years ago so one should examine these typewriters to be certain they have a type bar and that it is original to the machine. This particular International Number 5 does have its original type bar and is in very good condition with an estimated rating of 2,2.

$2125.00

SOLD


Keystone Typewriter serial# 3341 A

The Keystone Typewriter came out in 1899 and the original model did not have a typeplate cover. A subsquent model did have a cover displaying an interesting logo mark. This particular machine is the earlier version without the cover plate. Other than the cover, there is little difference in the two models. This typewriter is often called a swinging-sector machine with a hammer striking the type from the rear of the carriage and the paper being fed from a coiled paper basket under the carriage. They were only made and marketed for a few years by the Keystone Typewriter Company of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

The carriage was made of pig iron (aka pot metal or white metal) and simply deteriorated or broke with use and over time explaining its lack of popularity and short life in the market. Also, this condition and short market life helps explain the relatively rarity of the Keystoe Typewriter.

This machine, serial #3341A, is in extraordinary and as found condition. We estimate its condition rating as a 2+,2+. The previous owner did a very good cleaning and polishing job and the machine shows very well. It comes with its original oak case which does display the name "Keystone".

This earlier version Keystone closly resembles a Hammond typewriter, both in look and in function and especially in the case with the cover one. When I acquired this machine at an antique show in Keene New Hampshire about four years ago I almost completely passed on it thinking it was a Hammond. I was set up at the show selling Adirondack and camp items and the machine was at a booth at the front of my isle. I walked by it several times thinking it was a Hammond and then when there was a break late in the afternoon and I was bored, I decided to walk over to inspect the Hammond. Wow, was I surprised to see it was a Keystone. Another one of those acquisition stories I will probably always remember.

$2675.00

SOLD


Sun Index Typewriter (The Dogbone)

This Sun is my favorite index typewriter. It was in a collection belonging to a typewriter repairman in New York City who had repaired typewriters for more than 50 years. I purchased his collection around 20 years ago and he died a few months later. This machine is in exceptional condition for being made in 1885. It is all original except I believe we did replace the paper letter index. It has its original type bar and original wooden box. It has to be the best surviving specimen. It is the one in the photograph on page 188 of Michael Adlers' From Creed to Qwerty published by Schiffer in 1997.While we are rating it a 2+,2 it could have easily been rated a 1,2. What price for the best?

$5150.00

SOLD


Bar Lock No 4 Typewriter serial# 13801

This Bar Lock No 4 is in very good to excellent condition and maybe even better than that. We rate this as a 2+,2 but others might rate it as a 1,2+. It has all of its original components and is in full working order. Its original hand sculptured copper shield is in its beautiful original condition. We estimate that this machine was made in 1895.

We have found no markings on the machine other than the "Bar Lock No 4" on the shield but we do know it was made by the Columbia Typewriter Company of New York. Partly because there are no other markings, we believe this machine was made in the United States for the US market and has never been out of the country. We acquired it for our inventory in 1994 from an 85 year old New York City typewriter repairman who serviced typewriters in the City for over 60 years. I remember him telling stories about famous writers he knew due to his long term service contracts with a few major newspapers.

He recalled taking this machine in as a trade sometime during the 1940s and was then happy to have it due to its outstanding condition. I remember purchasing his entire collection and every one of the machines were operating as good, or perhaps even better, than when out of the factory. The repairman was truly a master technician. My favorite machine in This Olde Office's collection also came from his inventory and it is the 1886 Sun Dogbone Index Typewriter. Sometimes, the typewriter acquisition stories and relationships we experience are as valuable as the antiques themselves.

Shipping this antique is going to be tricky due to its weight and configuation and we recommend pick up or delivery if possible. Also, we could meet somewhere on the Northeastern Seaboard or at Brimfield, etc. If not, we will very carefully double box and pack the machine for shipment. We will insure, pack and ship anywhere in US for $80 (US Parcel Post) or outside the US (US Priority International) for $155.

$2650.00

SOLD


Crown Index Typewriter

This round base version of the early Crown Index was invented by typewriter innovator Byron Alden Brooks and dates to around 1888. This machine has been fully and beautifully restored to its original factory fresh condition. The replaced type ball is an identical replica faux model made from the real thing, with that exception we grade this a 1,1.

$10650.00

SOLD


Fox No 10

This Fox 10 was the last understrike model made by Fox and it is really quite difficult to find a model 10. It was introdued in 1906 and later in that same year Fox introduced its' first visible machine, a model 23. Obviously the visible model totally obsoleted the understrikes and the model 10 was discountinued the same year it was introduced.

This machine has been fully restored and has a condition rating of 2+,2-.

$1175.00

SOLD


Stearns Visible No 2

A typewriter invented by J.E.Thomas, August Schneclock and Franz Wagner (the inventor of the Underwood) in 1908. It was manufactured by the Stearns Bicycle Company of Syracuse, New York. This is the typewriter in the photograph on page 84 of Adler's From Creed to Qwerty published Schiffer in 1997. We have estimated the condition rating as a 2,2.

$565.00

SOLD


MOLLE NO 3 serial # 5571

This Molle No 3 was made in Oshkosh, Wisconsin by the MolleTypewriter Company in 1918. It was invented by a Wisconsin watchmaker, John E. Molle. Unfortunately the Molle wasn't very successful and the company filed for bankruptcy in 1922. The last patent date shown on this machine is 1918.

$400.00

SOLD


American No 8 serial # 27017

This American No 8 keyboard machine and the Sun keyboard machine were both made out of sheet metal and each was made by a successful index typewriter manufacturer. They are given much of the credit to the obsolesence of index typewriting technologies. They both came out just after the turn-of-the-century and provided inexpensive keyboad speed. This American No 8 is the one in the photograph on page 113 of Adler's From Creed to Qwerty published by Schiffer in 1997. This American was manufactured around 1908 and was restored but it is not functioning well and the reason for the 2+,4 condition rating.

$375.00

SOLD


The Sun No 2

The Sun No 2 was introduced in 1901 by The Sun Typewriter Company of New York. It was patented by Lee S. Burridge who held patents on the Sun Index Typewriters. This machine sold for $40 when new and was the first non cast iron key board typewriter. Its low cost and keyboard design significantly helped to obsolete index typewriting. This specific machine is the one in the photograph on page 10 of Adler's From Creed to Qwerty published by Schiffer in 1997.
It comes with its original carrying case and has a condition rating of 2,2.

$485.00

SOLD


Blue Corona 3 Special Folding Typewriter

The colored portables will be the first to achieve collectible status and colored folding Coronas are hard to find. This one has a serial number of BX617957 indicating it was manufactured in 1928 and shortly after the LC Smith & Bros and the Corona merger. In fact, this machine is marked Smith & Corona. The folding Corona 3 is in a collectible status all by itself. See the Smith Premier One for Corona's place in the 100 years of manual typewriting history. This one is in very good condition and has a condition rating of 2,2.

$275.00

SOLD



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